Get your teen to stop texting while driving!

Distracted driving, frequently caused by texting, is the leading cause of those car accidents. If asking your teen to put away the phone doesn’t work, there are apps out there that can help.

Source: www.philly.com

Get your teen to stop texting while driving!

 

Driving is complicated and the statistics regarding car crashes are staggering. In addition, awareness is not the issue.

 

How we can combat distracted driving:

 

"The simplest solution is to silence the phone and put it away. … That old adage, out of sight, out of mind is true. A more modern option is to find an app. There are a number of apps available to prevent texting and driving and most are free. … Finally, … use a designated texter.

 

The science is clear, we need to have our brains fully focused on the road while driving."

 

Article by: Cynthia Boyer via philly[dot]com

See on Scoop.itNebraska and National Accident, Injury & Disability Information

OSHA’s Top 10 Workplace Safety Violations For 2014

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently announced its preliminary Top 10 most frequently cited workplace safety violations for fiscal year 2014. Unfortunately, the top 10 for 2014 was the same as 2013. This demonstrates that employers continue

Source: lapinlawoffices.com

OSHA’s Top 10 Workplace Safety Violations for 2014

 

OSHA recently announced its preliminary top 10 workplace safety violations for 2014. Unfortunately, these violations remain the same as 2013. This helps show that employers are not doing enough in these areas to protect workers.

 

Nebraska workers injured on the job, including for these types of violations, are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

 

Read the full post by Jeffrey Lapin on Lapin Law Offices’ website blog:

http://lapinlawoffices.com/lapin-law-offices-blog/osha-top-10-workplace-safety-violations-2014

See on Scoop.itLapin Law Offices

Five Things Google Probably Knows About You

The majority of us use Google. It opens up the Internet, lets us explore and learn. It helps us expand our minds. And in return, it’s collected information about you. That much, we know. It’s common knowledge. A phrase that has quite recently become everyday is: “If you’re not paying for the product, you are…

Source: www.makeuseof.com

Five Things Google Probably Knows About You

 

by Philip Bates via MakeUseOf

 

The 5 things listed in the article are:

 

Demographic information: gender and age
Your interests
Your IP address, which may be where you live
What’s in your Gmail
When you use the internet

 

Depending on your settings and whether you use Google products, such as Google+, Google might know a lot more.

 

Should you care that Google knows these things? Probably not except for Gmail, which should never be used for confidential or private emails anyway.

 

You can limit some of the things Google knows about you by changing some of your Google and browser settings. The article suggests not using Google for search as some other search engines do not track you. However, the only way to be completely anonymous online is to stay off the internet.

See on Scoop.itNebraska and National Consumer Protection

California Businesses Liable For Limiting Negative Reviews

California will become the first state that will impose civil penalties for businesses that include non-disparagement clauses, which are those that limit or prohibit negative reviews by customers. The law also goes farther and punishes businesses that “otherwise penalize” consumers for negative

Source: lapinlawoffices.com

California Businesses Liable For Limiting Negative Reviews

 

Soon, California will make businesses civilly liable, up to $10,000, for limiting consumers from making negative reviews. California is the first state to prevent businesses from including non-disparagement in their contracts or otherwise prevent consumers from criticizing a business. However, there are questions that the statute does not answer about what a business can do about false reviews.

 

 

Read the full post by Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices on Lapin Law Offices’ Website Blog: California Businesses Liable For Limiting Negative Reviews (http://lapinlawoffices.com/lapin-law-offices-blog/california-businesses-liable-for-limiting-negative-reviews)

See on Scoop.itLapin Law Offices

Woman accused of using Facebook while driving is charged with homicide

(CNN) — A North Dakota woman who police say was using Facebook on her cellphone when she crashed into another car is accused of negligent homicide in the death of a great-grandmother during the Ma…

Source: fox4kc.com

A 20-year-old North Dakota woman has been charged with negligent homicide after a rear-end crash that caused the death of an 89 year-old grandmother, who was seated in the passenger seat of the vehicle that was struck. According to the complaint and affidavit filed against her, the woman is accused of surfing Facebook on her phone while driving approximately 85 mph. She allegedly did not brake at all before the crash. Investigators obtained a warrant to search the woman’s phone, which allegedly revealed the Facebook use as well as several text messages being sent while the woman was driving.

 

Source: CNN Wire / Fox4KC

See on Scoop.itEverything Marketing You Can Think Of

‘Dating Naked’ cast member sues after crotch-blur fail

VH1 looked more like the Playboy Channel when they accidentally aired an uncensored crotch shot during an episode of the reality show “Dating Naked,” a star of the show claims in a new lawsuit. Jes…

Source: nypost.com

Legitimate lawsuit or publicity stunt?

 

Jessie Nizewitz, a "star" on VH1’s "Dating Naked" reality show, filed a $10 million lawsuit against the show and other entities for showing an uncensored crotch shot during an episode that aired on July 31. Ms. Nizewitz claims that she was repeatedly told that her private parts would be "blurred out." 

 

VH1’s website describes the show:

"These days we’re supposed to be more “connected” than ever, but it’s actually harder than ever to truly connect. Online dates, blind dates, and the latest in ridiculous dating apps all make it hard to see people for who they really are. 

A new social experiment provides daters with a radical dating experience where before they bare their souls they bare everything else first. Each week on a primitive island resort, far from the masks of modern society, daters will go on exotic dates and be naked every step of the way. 

We will follow along as two primitive daters each go on a total of three naked dates, including their first date with each other. At the end of this experience they’ll choose which of their naked dates they would like to continue dating back home. Clothing will of course be optional. 

Naked daters will bare their soul and a whole lot more in this groundbreaking dating experiment."

 

After the episode aired she received a lot of messages on social media about the "crotch shot." Also, she claims the show cost her a “budding relationship” with a man she had been seeing for a month. 

 

In an interview with the New York Post, Nizewitz said, "My grandma saw it. I saw her this week and she didn’t have much to say to me. She’s probably mad. My parents are just annoyed. … I think they owe me a huge apology." 

 

It is hard to believe that she could complain about being shown naked when the show itself is about naked dating. Another major problem with her lawsuit is an alleged statement from her on Cosmopolitan, "I’m extremely comfortable in my own skin. Honestly, being naked to me means absolutely nothing." (http://www.cosmopolitan.com/entertainment/tv/g4213/all-the-butts-of-dating-naked-so-far/?slide=4).

 

This could all just be a publicity stunt because of the media attention she has drawn about her lawsuit and people trying to find the episode. 

 

Source: By Jamie Schram and Amber Sutherland / New York Post: ‘Dating Naked’ cast member sues after crotch-blur fail

See on Scoop.itNebraska and National Legal and Other News

The Gyroscopes in Your Phone Could Let Apps Eavesdrop on Conversations | Threat Level | WIRED

In the age of surveillance paranoia, most smartphone users know better than to give a random app or website permission to use their device’s microphone. But researchers have found there’s another, little-considered sensor in modern phones that can also listen in on their conversations. And it doesn’t even need to ask. In a presentation at…

Source: www.wired.com

New potential privacy concern with your smartphone: Phone gyroscopes might be able to allow apps to eavesdrop.
The gyroscope in phones, which are used to measure a phone’s orientation, are sensitive enough to pick up some sound waves, which turns them into a crude microphone.  Dan Boneh, a computer security professor at Stanford, summed the issue succinctly, "Whenever you grant anyone access to sensors on a device, you’re going to have unintended consequences."  New potential privacy concern with your smartphone: Phone gyroscopes might be able to allow apps to eavesdrop.  Essentially, the gyroscope in iOS and Android phones, which are used to measure a phone’s orientation, are sensitive enough to pick up some sound waves, which turns them into a crude microphone, according to researchers.  Dan Boneh, a computer security professor at Stanford, summed the issue succinctly, "Whenever you grant anyone access to sensors on a device, you’re going to have unintended consequences."  Both iOS and Android devices use gyroscopes that can pick up sound vibrations. However, iOS limits the reading of the gyroscopes to 100 hertz, which makes audio spying much more difficult. Android devices are more vulnerable as they allows apps to read the sensor’s data at twice that speed. Google is likely aware of this issue.  While it is believed that this using gyroscopes to eavesdrop has not been exploited yet, the potential is there. As speech recognition improves, these vulnerabilities become more of a threat.  Google could make Android less vulnerable by limiting the frequency like Apple does. Another possibility, which phones have or are implemented, is limiting the gyroscope frequency and even its use on a system-wide or app-by-app basis.  Article by: Andy Greenberg via Wired

See on Scoop.itNebraska and National Consumer Protection

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